NATIONAL PARKS SAFARIS ETHIOPIA

HIGHLIGHTS, WHERE THEY ARE AND HOW TO VISIT

 

NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA

Welcome to NATIONAL PARKS WORLDWIDE with the national parks, nature reserves and other protected areas of all countries of the world. National parks are the prime locations of wild and untamed nature; in many countries they are the most exiting places to visit, if you can find them. This website is your first help for getting to the national parks of Ethiopia. In many developing countries, the protected areas are still difficult to get to. That is the reason why local travel agencies are often reluctant to take you there, while others have their own agenda, favoring a lodge in a private reserve with insignificant forest or nature. And yet, with the proper knowledge, transportation and gear, visiting national parks is usually relatively affordable, provided that you don't expect 5 star accommodations.

 

A picture is worth a thousand words. Most of our hundreds of pictures are favored in Google! Why? Because no other website has so many beautiful high resolution pictures, taken by ourselves. Our pictures not only show you the beauty of Ethiopia, but they also show that we go everywhere, photographing wildlife, plants, people and culture. They show our professionalism, our keen eye for detail and our passion for the culture and nature of Ethiopia. So why consider booking our our Ethiopia Culture & National Parks modules? Because we don't mislead you like many tour operators do. When the Blue Nile falls are dry.... we tell you. When fog clouds the lava lake of Erte Ale? We let you know. Just drop us a mail and we will check it out for you.

Our tours get you to ALL the cultural places Ethiopia is so famous for, and on top of that, you get to see up to 12 National Parks/Reserves accompanied by a conservation forester. There is nothing similar on the market.

As Ethiopia can be combined with other East African countries, we organize tours in modules. Destinations Overview: Historical Circuit; Danakil Depression; Eastern Route; Simien Mountains; Bale Mountains; Southern Parks Safari; Gambella; Addis Ababa. BUT WAIT: if you buy your international ticket with Ethiopia Airlines, they will sell the internal flights at a price that you can't even ride the bus for. But you MUST plan it all in one package and making changes may be very costly. So let us help you plan your entire trip and book your local flights for an incredibly low price after you booked your international flight with Ethiopian Airlines!

 

NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: 2012 MAP

 

National Parks of Ethiopia Animals

When going on a safari, you expect to see lots of Zebras, Giraffes, Elephants, Hippos, Buffaloes, Gazelles, Antelopes, Rhinos etc.  at close range. Such conditions no longer exist in Ethiopia, and only a few national parks of Ethiopia have  populations large animals. The best national parks are: Omo National Park, Gambella National Park, Senkele Swayne’s Hartebeest Sanctuary and Nechsar National Park, of which just the last two are reasonably accessible. Nevertheless, what the national parks of Ethiopia lack in numbers they compensate with endemic species of birds and mammals as well as a few interesting species for their behavior.

 

Seasonally, the migration of the White-eared Kob, Kobus kob, is a dramatic spectacle to see as it forms the second largest mammal migration in Africa. Travelling across the open woodland bush in South Sudan at the end of the dry season, they visit the plains of the Baro and Gilo Rivers, where Gambella National Park is located, in search of open water and wetlands. More than a million of them are estimated to come to those wetlands on the border of South Sudan and Ethiopia each year, along with much smaller herds of Buffaloes and a scattering of Elephants and Giraffes.

 

Of the "big five" (Elephant, Lion, Rhinoceros, Leopard, African Buffelo), the Rhinos have disappeared, but small herds of Elephants are still still present in Kafta Shiraro National Park and the Babile Elephant Sanctuary, where they are monitored with teletracking equipment. With more than 300 individuals, the Babile herd is the largest in the country.

 

Of the three surviving Zebra species, two occur in Ethiopia, the Plains Zebra, Equus quagga, and the Grévy's Zebra, Equus grevyi . Formerly common in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, Grevy’s Zebra currently depends for its survival on Kenya and Ethiopia, with the populations in Ethiopia being greatly diminished.

 

The Somali Wild Ass, Equus africanus somaliensis, is the only surviving race of Equus africanus and only about 100 individuals remain in the wild, migrating north-south along the Awash valley and Afar Depression into Eritrea.

 

Swayne's Hartebeest was previously found in both Somalia and Ethiopia, but now it is restricted to Ethiopia only. The small surviving population is restricted to the grass and thorn scrub plains of the Rift Valley lakes region. The best known herd is about 100 head which inhabits an area of 400 sq. km in and near the Nechsar National Park. However, the largest known population is on the heavily settled plain of Senkele Swayne’s Hartebeest Sanctuary, where a population survives of about 500 individuals.

 

Ethiopia is home to the world’s only population of Walia Ibex, Capra walie, which is found only in and around the Simien Mountains National Park and classified as “endangered” according to the IUCN Red list criteria. Being down to 200 - 250 individuals in 1994- 1996, the population has recovered to 745 individuals during the 2009 count and is very visible in the park.

 

The Mountain Nyala, Tragelaphus buxtoni, is endemic to the eastern highlands of Ethiopia, south-east of the Rift Valley, between 6°N and 10°N. Formerly it occurred from Gara Muleta in the east to Shashemene and north Sidamo in the south, but has been eliminated from a large part of its former range. Currently, the main area of distribution is the Bale Mountains National Park and the eastern escarpments of the Bale massif.

 

The Ethiopian Wolf, Canis simensis, is perhaps the most researched of all the endangered species of Ethiopia. Population estimates of the Ethiopian Wolf across the species’ range suggest that between 360 and 440 adult wolves remain, of which less than 250 are mature individuals. From a tourism point of view the Ethiopian Wolf is well-visible in most areas where it occurs and is a prized attraction for both Simien Mountains and Bale Mountains National Parks, as well as for the community parks where it occurs.

 

Other canines include the Golden Jackal, Canis aureus, Black-backed Jackal, Canis mesomelas and the Side-striped Jackal, Canis adustus, are also widespread, and like many mid-size predators. While still occurring widely in Ethiopia, Striped and Spotted Hyenas, Hyaena hyaena and Crocuta crocuta, are common highlights for tourists. While the Striped Hyena is essentially a rural, solitary, lowland species, the Spotted Hyena is common on the plateau, and even in urban areas, including Addis Ababa. The spectacle of wild Spotted Hyenas being hand-fed outside the city walls of Harrar is a notable tourist attraction. The much smaller Aardwolf, Proteles cristata, is fairly common - though rarely seen - in the eastern lowlands, including Awash National Park.

 

The three large African cats are still present in Ethiopia, albeit at severely reduced levels. The Black Mane Lion, Panthera leo abyssinica or Abyssinian Lion, a subspecies of the Lion, is revered in Ethiopia, where it symbolizes both the nation and the former emperor; it occurs on the national currency and is often depicted in statues. Abyssinian lions are smaller than their East African cousins and the males have distinguishable dark manes. Experts say only 1,000 Abyssinian lions remain in Ethiopia. No data are available on the common species.

 

The number of known resident Cheetahs, Acinonyx jubatus in eastern Africa (Ethiopia, South Sudan, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania) is estimated at 2,500 adults and independent adolescents. In Ethiopia, the species occurs in the Danakil Depression, and other sources relate it to occur in the Ogaden desert, but no recent records from scientists could be verified.

 

Reportedly, Leopards, Panthera pardus, are still widespread throughout Ethiopia, but no data have been found to corroborate such statements. The species is highly adaptable, and can be found from rainforests to deserts. With up to 4 cubs per litter, it has a high potential for survival under conditions of high mortality, such as high hunting pressure. The leopard consumes virtually any animal that it can hunt down and catch and its prey includes small animals, by means of which it can survive in areas where big game has become scarce.

 

The Gelada, Theropithecus gelada, is an endemic primate restricted to high grassland escarpments in the deep gorges of the central Ethiopian plateau, between 1,800 and 4,400 masl. The Blue Nile gorge and the upper Shebelle River valley (east of the Bale massif) mark the western and southeastern boundaries of the range, respectively. Gelada overall has a large range and is still abundant despite increasing threats to the species.

Area Managed by Established Area in ha

National Parks managed by EWCA

Abijata Shala
Lakes
Oromia 1963 88,700
Alatish Amhara 1997 266,600
Awash Oromia & Afar 1958 75,600
Bale Mountains Oromia 1962 247,100
Gambella Gambella 1966 506,100
Geralle Somali 1998 385,800
Kafta Shiraro7 Tigray 1999 250,000
Nechsar SNNP 1966 51,400
Omo SNNP 1959 406,800
Simien Moun
tains
Amhara 1959 41,200
Yangudi Rassa Afar 1969 473,100

National Parks and Sanctuaries managed by the Regions

Bahir Dar Blue
Nile river Mil
lennium
Amhara

2008

472,900

Arsi Mountains Oromia  
Borena Sayent Amhara 2009

4,400

Chebera
Churchura
SNNP 2007

119,000

Dati Wolel Oromia 2008

43,100

Denkoro Chaka Amhara 1999

38,117

Gibe Sheleko SNNP 2010

24,800

Kuni Muktar Oromia  

150,000

Leka SNNP  
Loka Abaya SNNP 2010

50,000

Mago SNNP 1984

194,200

Maze SNNP 2007

20,200

Yabello Oromia 1978

250,000

Biosphere Reserves

Kaffa-Bonga SNNP 2010  
Yayu Oromia 2011  
Lake Tana Amhara 2011  

Wildlife Sanctuaries managed by EWCA

Babile Elephant
Sanctuary
Oromia & Somali 1962

698,200

Senkele
Swayne’s Harte
beest Sanctuary
Oromia & SNNP 1964

5,400

Wildlife Reserves managed by the Regions

Alledeghi Afar  

193,389

Awash west Afar  

415,000

Bale Oromia  

127,922

Chelbi SNNP -

421,200

Gewane Afar  
Mille Serdo Afar  

650,354

Community Conservation Areas

Abune Yosef Amhara  
Guassa Menz Amhara  
Tama SNNP -

166,500

Simien Gibe SNNP

2001

4,900

Garameba SNNP

2001

2,500

Controlled hunting areas managed by the Regions

Abasheba Dem
ero
Oromia

2004

21,000

Adaba-Dodola Oromia

2010

73,600

Aluto Oromia

 

28,000

Arba-Gugu Oromia

2005

34,100

Besemena-Oddo
Bulu
Oromia

2003

35,000

Bilen Hertalie Afar

-

109,000

Chiffra Afar

1998

51,000

Dembel Ayisha
Adigala
Somali  

91,000

Dindin Oromia -

28,000

Hanto Oromia

2001

19,000

Hurufa Suma Oromia

2000

21,500

Haro Aba Dika Oromia

2010

20,000

Melke Sadi Afar  
Munessa Oromia

2003

11,100

Murulle SNNP

-

69,000

Shedem Berbere Oromia

1988

17,000

Shinilie Meto Somali

 

48,400

Sororo Torgum Oromia

2000

7,800

Telalk Dewe Afar

-

72,820

Welshet Sala SNNP

2000

35,000

Wergan Bula Oromia

2010

7,800

Open controlled hunting areas managed by the Regions

Debre Libanos Oromia -

3,100

Gara Gumbi Oromia -

14,000

Gara Meti Oromia -

24,000

Gelila Duru Afar -

14,000

Jibat Oromia -

10,000

Sinana Oromia -

1,500

 

 

Savannah mammals

NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The Abyssinian or Black Mane Lion still occurs in Ethiopia but at very low levels of its population. NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: There are no data on the Cheetah, but it is supposed to still survive in isolated regions like the Danakil Depression and the Somali Region.

The Abyssinian or Black Mane Lion still occurs in Ethiopia but at very low levels of its population.

There are no data on Cheetahs, but it is supposed to still survive in isolated regions like the Danakil Depression and the Somali Region.

   
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Swayne's Hartebeest now only occur in Ethiopia, particularly in Nechsar National Park and Senkele Swayne’s Hartebeest Sanctuary. NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Several protected areas in the Central Rift valley have decent populations of the Plains' or Burchell's Zebras.

Swayne's Hartebeest now only occur in Ethiopia, particularly in Nechsar National Park and Senkele Swayne’s Hartebeest Sanctuary.

Several protected areas in the Central Rift valley have decent populations of the Plains' or Burchell's Zebras.

   
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Hippos are still rather widespread along different water bodies Ethiopia, including Lake Tana NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: the largest elephant herd is in Babile Elephant Sanctuary

Hippos are still rather widespread along different water bodies of the country, including Lake Tana, where the can be frequently seen at the south east outlet into the Blue Nile.

Small elephant herds are scattered along different park of the country; the largest herd in Babile Elephant Sanctuary.

   
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Common in Awash National Park, the Oryx is a very draught hardy species NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Some of the last Somali Asses still survive in the Danakil Desert

Common in Awash National Park, the Oryx is a very draught hardy species, that even occurs in extreme deserts like the Danakil Depresson.

With only about 100 individuals left in the wild, the Somali wild ass is one of the most threatened large mammals in the world. It occurs in the parks of the Afar Triangle.

   
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The White-eared Kob, is the second most common migratory mammal in Africa. Its most eastern range is Gambella National Park, Ethiopia NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: Remnant populations of the African buffalo can be seen in quite a few of the national parks of Ethiopa

The White-eared Kob, is the second most common migratory mammal in Africa. Its most eastern range is Gambella National Park, where it can be seen during the season.

Remnant populations of the Cape buffalos can be seen in quite a few of the national parks, but it is most common in Gambella National Park.

 

Highland Wild Animals

 
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The Gelada is an endemic baboon of the highland grasslands of Ethiopia NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The Mountain Nyala is a common endemic antelope in Bale National Park

The Gelada is an endemic baboon of the highland grasslands. It is still very common and sightings in the Simien Mountains National Park are almost guaranteed.

The Mountain Nyala is a common endemic antelope in Bale National Park, where sightings are frequent.

   
NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The Walia Ibex has been recovering over the last decade in its only area of distribution, Simien Mountains National Park NATIONAL PARKS OF ETHIOPIA LISTS OF ANIMALS: The Ethiopian Wolf is the flagship species for conservation in Ethiopia

The Walia Ibex has been recovering over the last decade in its only area of distribution, Simien Mountains National Park, where chances are high to see it grazing in the Afro-alpine meadows.

 

The Ethiopian Wolf is the flagship species for conservation in Ethiopia and well visible in Simien Mountains and Bale National Parks.

What makes us different from so many other tour operators?

Just look at the quality of our high resolution pictures. We took them all ourselves. We have thousands of high resolution pictures on this website, that you can see enlarged by clicking on them. These pictures show that we have been everywhere in the country of your interest and really know the details. We are professional explorers and biologists with MSc and PhD.

 

National Parks Tours Worldwide, a social responsibility and conservation company, is a brand name of the World Institute for Conservation & Environment, registered in the Netherlands with headquarters in the USA.

 

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